But the problem is over time all that drone footage starts looking the same, people fall into a rut and they start doing the exact same shots where they're, panning down and panning up on something or they're crawling up the side of a building and they're exciting. The first time you see them, but there are thousands of videos out there that all start. Looking the same, so i like to mix it up a little bit and there's a couple of drone shots that i use on a regular basis. That just add a lot of interest to the clip now i'm, not a cinematographer i'm, not francis ford coppola. So all those professional photographers out there are going to laugh when i start talking about these different drone shots. But to me, these are ones that i use on a regular basis. My clients seem to like them and they make the videos a little bit more interesting, so i'm going to show you a couple today that are really easy to do. You'Ll have to practice a little bit, but i promise you they're going to jazz things up for you and add a little bit of panache to your video, so this first one we're going to do i like to call the electric slide. I don't know why. I call it that i guess i'm, a child of the 60s, but anyway that's the first one and it's a shot where you're sliding along something that's blocking your view as you're elevating and you're sort of doing a reveal as you're going sideways it's a very impressive Shot so stay tuned and i'll show you that one first in this first shot i've got the drone hovering about 30 feet off the ground.

There'S, a tall stand of trees right in front of me and just on the other side of those trees is a beautiful horse farm. Now i know the main building is off to the right, because i've already scattered the location, long driveway, leading up to it. A lot of fencing, beautiful fields and trees behind it a few horse pens now i could just elevate the quad up past those trees and reveal the property all at once, but that's not really interesting. What i'd rather do is slide along those trees. What i'm doing is forcing the viewers focus and close at those trees and it's, showing them the expanse of the property so i'm sliding along the trees and as i'm doing that i'm. Slowly, elevating building suspense you're wondering what's on the other side of those trees and then once i crest those trees, i gently spin to face that main building and reveal the entire property, and i think that's a lot more interesting because it shows you the grand scope Of that property and the area around it it's just a, i think, a nicer way of revealing a property of that size. This segment i shot in the pine barrens in new jersey and it's, one of my favorite places to go and if you've never heard of it it's this large area, hundreds and hundreds of acres of undisturbed, pine trees, that's, just a beautiful place to go hiking or Walking or just sitting out for an afternoon and relaxing – and i go down there an awful lot and what i'm trying to get across in this shot is just how large that area is now.

I could just elevate the quad again over the tops of the trees and you'd, see just how big that area is and how undisturbed it is, and beautiful, but again that's fairly boring. So what i'm going to do with the shot is stay down low and stay close to the trees and draw that viewer's attention into the forest, because the way the light is coming down through those trees, it's creating a really interesting landscape in there. A lot of dark and light spots, a lot of really interesting textures and, as i pull to the right i'm slowly elevating again building tension. I wonder what's going to be over the top of those trees and when i crest those trees and kind of gently look down, you get a real sense of how big that area is and how beautiful it is down there. This next move, i call the slingshot and you'll, see why, in a minute, it takes advantage of two camera movements that you can accomplish pretty easily with a drone that are either difficult or expensive to do with a traditional camera and those are showing speed and showing Elevation now i'm sure there's an official name for this move as well, and you photographers out there probably giggling right now, thinking rick that's, nothing more than a elevated tracking shot, but in drone valley parlance we call it the slingshot and it's a really good move to Use if you're trying to reveal a point of interest, let's, say you're out there's, a beautiful lake or you're filming a home, and you want to add some drama to that shot and the way this one works is you start off hovering close to the ground, and I mean like dangerously close to the ground and it really helps if you've got some texture below you.

So if there's grass or a field that you're filming in get down as close as you can to the top of that grass you're going to take off really fast towards your point of interest, now you're going to make sure you line up your shot. And if you can find something to block that point of interest, even better, so if there's a standard, trees, try and line yourself up so that those trees are blocking, that point of interest start off really fast. That'S going to give you a sense of incredible speed across that landscape, because you're close to it and your eyes are drawn down to it. Man you're moving along you're, really whipping along with that drone and, as you start approaching, that barrier that stand of trees downfield, the viewer is going to look at that and think. Oh, my gosh he's going to hit those trees. I wonder if he's going to clear those trees but you're gently elevating as you get close to those trees just when you're on top of those trees, you crest over the top and look down at that point of interest and what you've done has taken that viewer Through a roller coaster, ride of speed in the beginning, elevation at the end, and it combines all the elements that i love about flying a drone but add that to a couple of your shots and you'll, be surprised. The reaction you get from your viewers now i've got a couple examples coming up so stay tuned for those.

This segment is the same horse farm from before, but i'm going to use the slingshot move to show you a different type of reveal now, in this case, i've got the quad down really close to the ground, it's only a couple of inches off that tall grass And i'm going to take off really quickly and head for that standard trees across the field. And what i'm trying to do is put that viewer sort of in the mind of a horse galloping through that field, just to show them how large the field is and give them a sense of the scope of the property and i'm building a little bit of Tension too, because i'm heading for those trees and i'm slowly elevating and the viewers looking at that wondering man is he going to make it over those trees or not so you're, drawing their attention to those trees, you're keeping them engaged in the video and you're? Basically, creating a narrative to reveal that property so, as i get closer to the trees and i crest over the top of those trees. Now the retention is down towards that main farmhouse at the end, so it gives them again a real sense of how large the property is, how beautiful it is, and how expansive that space from where i started to, where that farmhouse is really conveys exactly how large And beautiful this property is this: last segment is one of my favorite i'm using the slingshot move again to convey speed and elevation and i'm down really close to the ground to start i'm actually down in the weeds.

The camera is hanging down far enough where it's, underneath the tops of that grass. So when i take off you get a sense of speed because i'm really close to that grass and then i slowly start to elevate and what i'm trying to convey here is. Maybe a deer running through the woods and then all of a sudden. It turns into an eagle and it flies up through the trees. But it gives you that sense of speed and that sense of elevation, which again, is the beauty of what a quad can bring to cinematography and then once i get up past the top of those trees, you can see again how large that area is and how Beautiful that area is so. I really like that shot. An awful lot, it's, also a tricky shot, because, when you're down near the ground, if you're not careful – and you hit maybe a little bit larger piece of grass down there, you're going to tumble into the grass. But then, coming up between those trees on that narrow road is also a little bit tricky. So it's a move. You got to practice an awful lot, but i promise you it'll definitely pay off in your shots. Okay, that's it for today, and i hope you've enjoyed this clip now. If you haven't, subscribed to the channel yet hit that button down there and join the drone valley family, we have a lot more clips coming up and we're, giving a few drones away as well.

So you definitely want to subscribe, so you get notifications when those giveaways happen and that way you can enter and maybe win a drone.